Dec 182014
 

"Maybe Christmas," he thought, "doesn't come from a store. Maybe Christmas... perhaps... means a little bit more!" ~ Dr. Seuss, How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (Photo by David R. Tribble)

“Maybe Christmas,” he thought, “doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas… perhaps… means a little bit more!” ~ Dr. Seuss, How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (Photo by David R. Tribble)

Whether you catch mommy kissing Santa Claus or a young man stealing his first kiss, kissing under the mistletoe is a worldwide tradition. But, why does a bit greenery give us permission to catch a kiss?

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has lots of trivia about this semi-parasitic plant and why it gives us permission to make off with a little romance.

 Posted by on December 18, 2014 at 12:06 am
Dec 152014
 

Today, poinsettias come in different colors (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

Today, poinsettias come in different colors (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

For many people the poinsettia is required for Christmas decorations. Today’s guest is David Trinklein and he has advice for choosing healthy poinsettias and keeping them looking good throughout the holiday.

 

The colorful part of the poinsettia are modified leaves called bracts. The true flowers, called ciathia, are found in the center of the bracts. (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

The colorful part of the poinsettia are modified leaves called bracts. The true flowers, called ciathia, are found in the center of the bracts. (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

 Posted by on December 15, 2014 at 5:47 pm
Nov 072014
 

Heavy rains in early October took care of drought in most of the state

Heavy rains in early October took care of drought in most of the state

A lot of rain fell on the Show-Me State in October. It delayed the harvest, eliminated statewide drought and set an all time record.

Today’s guest is Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program.

 

 

Visit Missouri Climate Center

"Autumn...the year's last, loveliest smile." William Cullen Bryant, an American romantic poet, journalist, and long-time editor of the New York Evening Post (Photo by Grethe Boe)

“Autumn…the year’s last, loveliest smile.” William Cullen Bryant, an American romantic poet, journalist, and long-time editor of the New York Evening Post (Photo by Grethe Boe)

 Posted by on November 7, 2014 at 7:53 pm
Oct 092014
 

Food preparation in the MUNCH metabolic kitchen (Photo by Kent Faddis)

Food preparation in the MUNCH metabolic kitchen (Photo by Kent Faddis)

The MU Nutritional Center for Health (MUNCH) and the MU Physical Activity and Wellness Center (PAW) opened on the University of Missouri, Columbia campus, this year. These state-of-the-art labs are joint projects of Mizzou’s Collage of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources (CAFNR) MU’s College of Human Environmental Science (HES) and the MU School of Medicine. Built and organized with collaboration in mind, this research hub can tackle complex health problems, like obesity, with a holistic approach.

Today’s guests are Christopher Hardin, director of the MUNCH and PAW labs, Ingolf Gruen, food scientist with CAFNR and Heather Leidy, a nutrition and exercise physiology research for the University of Missouri.

 

Preparation for an exercise stress test at the PAW center (Photo by Kent Faddis)

Preparation for an exercise stress test at the PAW center (Photo by Kent Faddis)

 

Cooking Up Solutions

MU Nutritional Center for Health

Cooking an Obesity Cure

 Posted by on October 9, 2014 at 6:12 pm
Oct 082014
 

Supercell thunderstorm in Atchison County, Missouri, September 9, 2014 (Photo by Clinton Dougherty)

Supercell thunderstorm in Atchison County, Missouri, September 9, 2014 (Photo by Clinton Dougherty)

Tons of rain hit parts of the Show-Me State and record-setting low visited Kansas City, Missouri.

Today’s guest is Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program.

 

 

Visit The Missouri Climate Center

Northern Holt County, Missouri after 7 inches of rain fell in 1 hour, September 9, 2014 (Photo by Bill Metzgar)

Northern Holt County, Missouri after 7 inches of rain fell in 1 hour, September 9, 2014 (Photo by Bill Metzgar)

 Posted by on October 8, 2014 at 9:22 pm
Sep 252014
 

"But make no mistake: the weeds will win; nature bats last" ~ Robert M. Pyle, lepidopterist and author (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

“But make no mistake: the weeds will win; nature bats last” ~ Robert M. Pyle, lepidopterist and author (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

Weeds, brush and overgrown trees aren’t just an eyesore for railroads. Out of control vegetation can reduce visibility for train operators and vehicles or pedestrians trying to cross the tracks.

Because this is a safety issue, railroad companies must keep weeds under control. That’s not as easy as it sounds and it can be pretty pricey. A weed scientist with the University of Missouri, works with railroads, testing experimental chemical mixtures and labeled products, searching for the most effective controls for the least amount of money.

 

 

Featured:

Reid Smeda, weed scientist for University of Missouri’s College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

Shane Riley, maintenance engineer for the Columbia Terminal railroad, or COLT

Photo by Debbie Johnson

Photo by Debbie Johnson

 Posted by on September 25, 2014 at 5:44 pm
Sep 092014
 

"A hospital should also have a recovery room adjoining the cashier's office" ~ author Francis O'Walsh

“A hospital should also have a recovery room adjoining the cashier’s office” ~ author Francis O’Walsh

Choosing the right health care plan can have a huge impact on our physical and financial health.  That’s why it’s important to understand terms, fees and out-of-pocket expenses when choosing group medical insurance.

Today’s guests are Brenda Procter, associate professor of personal finance for University of Missouri Extension and Graham McCaulley, an MU Extension personal financial planning specialist. The term for today is copayment.

 

 

 

More information can be found at University of Missouri Extension’s Health Insurance Initiative, Cover Missouri and Health Literacy Missouri

 

 

 Posted by on September 9, 2014 at 10:13 pm
Aug 252014
 

Frank Wideman, natural resource engineer for MU Extension (Photo by Kent Faddis, MU Extension Communications)

Many small towns rely on volunteer firefighters to protect and serve their community. But there’s problem. Volunteers may not know where all the fire hydrants are. Fredricktown, Missouri, found a way to correct that problem. They gave local Fredricktown Boy Scouts a project: Collect GPS coordinates on the 300 fire hydrants in town.

 

 

 

John Clark, Fredricktown Fire Chief, driving the fire engine. (Photo by Kent Faddis, MU Extension Communications)

Bill Starkey, Cherokee Pass Fire Chief (Photo by Kent Faddis, MU Extension Communications)

Bill Starkey, Cherokee Pass Fire Chief, driving the 4-wheeler used in search and rescue. (Photo by Kent Faddis, MU Extension Communications)

Fredricktown Boy Scouts collected GPS coordinates for the town's 300 hydrants (Photo by Kent Faddis, MU Extension Communications)

Fredricktown Boy Scouts collected GPS coordinates for the town’s 300 hydrants (Photo by Kent Faddis, MU Extension Communications)

 Posted by on August 25, 2014 at 9:12 pm
Aug 152014
 
Garden Journal available from University of Missouri Extension

Garden Journal available from University of Missouri Extension (Photo by Kent Faddis)

University of Missouri Extension offers a useful tool to help both new and experience gardeners create and maintain beautiful and productive gardens. The Garden Journal will help you keep track of everything in your garden. It explains hardiness zones, soil tests, monthly garden tips and tips for controlling pests and diseases.

 

 

Order: From Seed to Harvest and Beyond: Garden Journal and Calendar

Sharron Unterreiner, a Master Gardener in Perry County Missouri (Photo by Kent Faddis)

Sharron Unterreiner, a Master Gardener in Perry County Missouri (Photo by Kent Faddis)

From left to right: Weldon and Sharron Unterreiner, Master Gardeners in Perry County Missouri, and Donna Aufdenberg, Horticulture Specialist for University of Missouri Extension (Photo by Kent Faddis)

From left to right: Weldon and Sharron Unterreiner, Master Gardeners in Perry County Missouri, and Donna Aufdenberg, Horticulture Specialist for University of Missouri Extension (Photo by Kent Faddis)

A sample worksheet found in "From Seed to Harvest and Beyond: Garden Journal and Calendar." (Photo by Kent Faddis)

A sample worksheet found in “From Seed to Harvest and Beyond: Garden Journal and Calendar.” (Photo by Kent Faddis)

 

 Posted by on August 15, 2014 at 5:48 pm
Aug 112014
 

Many things can attack a plant causing it to decline (Photo by Jon Lamb - University of Missouri Extension Communications)

Many things can attack a plant causing it to decline (Photo by Jon Lamb – University of Missouri Extension Communications)

Indiscriminately spreading chemicals for ailing plants is a bad idea. Many things can cause problems for plants: insects, viruses, bacteria, fungi and even poor nutrition. You need to know what’s wrong before you can choose the correct treatment. For people in the Midwest, the University of Missouri’s Plant Diagnostic Clinic is a good place to get your plant problems diagnosed.

 

 

 

 

MU Plant Diagnostic Clinic

Patti Wallace, director of the MU Plant Diagnostic Clinic, examines an ailing tomato plant (Photo by Jon Lamb, University of Missouri Extension Communications

Patti Wallace, director of the MU Plant Diagnostic Clinic, examines an ailing tomato plant (Photo by Jon Lamb, University of Missouri Extension Communications

 

 Posted by on August 11, 2014 at 4:40 pm