Month: November 2013

Handle Leftover Turkey Safely
"A lot of Thanksgiving days have been ruined by not carving the turkey in the kitchen." ~ Humorist Kin Hubbard (Photo by Anna Hagen)

“A lot of Thanksgiving days have been ruined by not carving the turkey in the kitchen.” ~ Humorist Kin Hubbard (Photo by Anna Hagen)

Food poisoning, or food-borne illness, is caused by bacteria contaminated food. You can’t taste it, smell it or see it, but improperly handled foods can make people sick. Most of us will have leftover turkey after the Thanksgiving meal and those leftovers need to be cooled down and refrigerated quickly.

Today’s guest is Tammy Roberts, nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She has some food safety tips and a couple of recipes for tasty leftover turkey meals.

Turkeys – Great for Dinner but Not Very Bright
"To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone." ~ Reba McEntire (Photo by Calle Eklund)

“To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone.” ~ Reba McEntire (Photo by Calle Eklund)

How about some turkey trivia? Americans consume over 675 million pounds of turkey on Thanksgiving Day. Sleepy after your big Thanksgiving meal? Turkey contains an amino acid called “Tryptophan”. Tryptophan sets off a chemical chain reaction that calms you down and makes you sleepy. The wishbone is a tradition of Thanksgiving. Allow the wishbone to dry. Then, two people grasp each end of the wishbone. After making a silent wish, they pull it away. Whoever gets the joint portion, gets their wish.

Today’s guest is Jeff Firman. He’s an animal scientist and poultry expert for University of Missouri’s College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. Raising turkeys is a challenge because while breeding them for plump, tasty meat, their brains were short-changed.

Don’t Let Criminals Spoil Your Holiday Shopping
Photo by Kent Faddis

Photo by Kent Faddis

While you’re traveling from store to store buying holiday gifts, criminals are watching and waiting for the opportunity to snatch your money and newly bought presents. Be aware of your surroundings and make  yourself less of a target. This will go a long way toward keeping you from being a victim. Today, we have tips from John Worden, director of the University of Missouri Extension’s Law Enforcement Training Institute.

October in Missouri: Record Low Temperatures and Much Needed Rain
October Temperatures. Graphic from Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program

October Temperatures. Graphic from Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program

October weather was an unusual weather month. It started out mild but the weather shifted and record low temperatures visited the Show-Me State. Rainfall averages were around normal, however, some dry spots in the state received much-needed rain. Today’s guest in Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program. He has an overview of October weather in Missouri and has predictions for November weather.

 

 

Missouri Climate Center

Hand Washing – The Best Defense Against Colds and Flu
"Handwashing is one of the most important means of preventing the spread of infection" according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  (Photo by Dani Toth)

“Hand washing is one of the most important means of preventing the spread of infection” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (Photo by Dani Toth)

You touch a doorknob then touch your nose. A few days later you have chills, a bad cough and sneezing. Frequent hand washing can help you stop infecting yourself with your hands.

This is most important for children. By teaching them to do a good job of washing their hands you can help them avoid colds and flu.

 

 

Hand washing poster