Month: March 2016

Resist the Urge to Work Garden Soil When It’s Wet
"Soil is a resource, a living, breathing entity that, if treated properly, will maintain itself. It's our lifeline for survival. When it has finally been depleted, the human population will disappear. Think about the meaning of being a steward for the earth." ~ Marjorie Harris, In the Garden, 1995

“Soil is a resource, a living, breathing entity that, if treated properly, will maintain itself. It’s our lifeline for survival.” ~ Marjorie Harris, In the Garden, 1995

Wet soil compacts very easily and working garden soil when it is wet can destroy years of hard work creating good soil structure.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He explains how to make sure your garden is ready before you start digging.

 

 

Soils, Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management

It’s All About the Slime – Building Living Soil
"To forget how to dig the earth and to tend the soil is to forget ourselves." ~ Mahatma Gandhi

“To forget how to dig the earth and to tend the soil is to forget ourselves.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

When soil microbes break down organic matter they produce mucilage, which is just a nice word for slime. It’s that byproduct that helps cement soil particles together creating rich, porous soil.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri. He has tips for turning poor soil into gardening “black gold.”

 

 

Improving Lawn and Landscape Soils

Interpreting Missouri Soil Test Reports

Handle With Care – The Key to Safe Easter Eggs
“Put all your eggs in one basket and then watch that basket!” ~ Andrew Carnegie

“Put all your eggs in one basket and then watch that basket!” ~ Andrew Carnegie

You might not see a brightly colored Easter egg as a dangerous object, but real eggs used on Easter egg hunts could harbor salmonella – a bacteria that can make you, and your family, sick if you eat it.

Today’s guest is MU Extension nutrition specialist Tammy Roberts. She has tips for a safe Easter egg hunt and how to choose fresh eggs.

 

 

Follow Rules When Preparing Easter Eggs

Spring Outlook in Missouri Another Coin Toss
Springtime is the land awakening. The March winds are the morning yawn. ~ writer Lewis Grizzard (Photo by Harald Hoyer)

Springtime is the land awakening. The March winds are the morning yawn. ~ writer Lewis Grizzard (Photo by Harald Hoyer)

Missouri is a transition state as far as weather is concerned. Part of the state is northern, another part is southern and there’s a part that’s in between the two. That makes weather forecasting in the Show-Me State a real challenge.

Today’s guest is Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension. Explains why you might have to toss a coin to determine what spring may bring.

 

 

Don’t Wait Too Long to Get Cool Season Vegetables in the Ground
Broccoli, a cole crop and cool season vegetable (Photo by Robert Wetzlmayr)

Broccoli, a cole crop and cool season vegetable (Photo by Robert Wetzlmayr)

Cool season vegetables, as their name implies, really like cool temperatures and cool soil. If you don’t plant these crops early enough there will not be enough time before the summer heat arrives, especially in Missouri. If you’re waiting until may to plant crops like spinach, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, just to name a few cool season crops, warm temperatures will wipe them out long before there’s a crop to harvest.

Today’s guest is Jennifer Schutter, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She talks about proper planting dates, how to transition from cool season vegetables to warm season ones and how to plant a second cool season crop.

 

 

Vegetable Gardening

 

Gardening is cheaper than therapy and

you get tomatoes. ~ Author Unknown

 

Cabbage and cauliflower - a cole crop and cool season vegetables

Cabbage and cauliflower – a cole crop and cool season vegetables

Shamrock – Dear Little Plant of the Irish Isles
True shamrock - Yellow flower Clover - Trifolium dubium (Photo by Krzysztof Ziarnek)

True shamrock – Yellow Flower Clover – Trifolium dubium (Photo by Krzysztof Ziarnek)

St. Patrick made the shamrock famous by, allegedly, using it to illustrate the Holy Trinity.

Shamrocks are a lucky addition to an Irish Bride’s bouquet and the groom’s boutonniere. So shamrock and Irish go hand-in-hand.

Today’s guest is Michele Warmund, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She talks about true shamrocks and the impostors often found around St. Patrick’s Day.

 

 

 

Wood sorrels, called the Lucky Shamrock plant, not a true shamrock (Photo by Michele Warmund, MU Extension horticulture specialist)

Wood sorrels, called the Lucky Shamrock plant, not a true shamrock (Photo by Michele Warmund, MU Extension horticulture specialist)

 

A best friend is like a four-leaf clover: hard to find and lucky to have.  ~ Author Unknown

 

 

 

The Gorgeous Lily – Beauty, Diversity and Fragrance
Lilium 'Capuchino' or Tango Lily and Asiatic hybrid (Photo by Bill Murray)

Lilium ‘Cappuccino’ or Tango Lily – Asiatic hybrid (Photo by Bill Murray)

There was a time when lilies were rare and difficult to grow. Thanks to Jan de Graaff there are many dependable lily hybrids available today. The Holland native began his first lily experiments in 1938 and produced Enchantment in 1941. Horticulture magazine called it “the most famous hybrid lily of all time.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He discusses popular lily hybrids and gives tips on how to add them to your garden.

 

 

Lily: A Symbol of Life

Lilium Dizzy - Oriental Hybrid (Photo by Bill Murray)

Lilium Dizzy – Oriental Hybrid (Photo by Bill Murray)

Lilium African Queen - Aurelian hybrid or Trumpet Lily (Photo by Thorkild Poulsen)

Lilium African Queen – Aurelian hybrid or Trumpet Lily (Photo by Thorkild Poulsen)