Category: Health

Breast Cancer Dialogues – Teaching Doctors and Patients How to Talk to Each Other
Mel George (right) tells Sally Foster (left) that she has severe breast cancer as part of the interactive theater, done by the MU Breast Cancer Project. (Photo by Emily Kaiser)

Mel George (right) tells Sally Foster (left) that she has severe breast cancer as part of the interactive theater, done by the MU Breast Cancer Project. (Photo by Emily Kaiser)

Whether you’re giving or getting bad news, knowing how to communicate is vital. This is most important when a doctor must tell a woman that she has breast cancer. The shocked patient must ask questions about what’s ahead. The doctor has to provide important information while still addressing the patient’s fears and confusion. There is no more important communication, but learning how to have this kind of dialogue isn’t easy. That’s where the University of Missouri’s Breast Cancer Dialogues, an interactive theater program, steps up.

This collaboration between University of Missouri Extension’s Community Arts Program, MU’s Family and Community Medicine department and MU’s Theater department gives both health providers and patients the opportunity to discuss what works, what doesn’t work and how to improve this very important communication.

 

 

Breast Cancer Dialogues

 

Building Healthy Habits Starts Early
"The way you think, the way you behave, the way you eat can influence your life by 30 to 50 years" ~ Deepak Chopra (Photo in the Public Domain from the National Institutes of Health)

“The way you think, the way you behave, the way you eat can influence your life by 30 to 50 years” ~ Deepak Chopra (Photo in the Public Domain from the National Institutes of Health)

Just like bathing and teeth brushing, healthy eating habits are the foundation for a healthy life. When toddlers and preschoolers are served nourishing, wholesome foods, they are more likely to eat these foods as they get older. That’s the goal of the Missouri Eat Smart Child Care initiative. This partnership between University of Missouri Extension and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services provides early childhood educators with the tools and information they need to introduce healthy habits to young children.

Today’s guests are Robin Gammon, University of Missouri Extension’s registered dietitian, Susan Mills-Gray…nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension and Shelley Gifford… director of the Little Einstein’s Learning Center in Blue Springs, Missouri.

 

Missouri Eat Smart Child Care Initiative

Helping Missourians Make Healthier Choices – There’s an App for That
Seasonal and Simple now available as a free app

Seasonal and Simple now available as a free app

Seasonal and Simple began as a very popular publication. Now it’s a new app that’s available on your smartphone or mobile device. The new app give you tons of useful information about fruits and vegetables. It also provides information about farmer’s markets throughout the state, and even has recipes for tasty suggestions for serving produce in season. Today’s guest is Cindy DeBlauw, a human environmental sciences specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She has lots of information about the new app.

 

 

Seasonal and Simple

Seasonal and Simple website

Seasonal and Simple iTunes

Which Oils and Fats are Healthy and Why?

Episode 52 – Fats and Oils

“In the Middle Ages, they had guillotines, stretch racks, whips and chains. Nowadays, we have a much more effective torture device called the bathroom scale.” ~ Stephen Phillips (Photo by Julia Freeman-Woolpert)

“In the Middle Ages, they had guillotines, stretch racks, whips and chains. Nowadays, we have a much more effective torture device called the bathroom scale.” ~ Stephen Phillips (Photo by Julia Freeman-Woolpert)

Judging from all the fat-free and low-fat foods available, you might consider fat a dietary evil. However, the body requires a certain amount of fatty acids to function properly. Choosing the correct type of dietary fat can mean the difference between health and disease.

Today’s guest is Janet Hackert, regional nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

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For more information:

Do you know your cholesterol numbers?

Gateway to Health newsletter

Variety is the Key to Fitness Success
“Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body; it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.” ~ John F. Kennedy  (Photo by Sanja Gjenero)

“Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body; it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.” ~ John F. Kennedy (Photo by Sanja Gjenero)

Are you trying to move from couch potato to a mover and shaker? That’s great news! You’ll feel better and be healthier.

There is no “magic bullet” for getting fit. The key is to start slow and gradually build up your strength, stamina and flexibility.

Today’s guest is Stephen Ball. He’s an exercise physiologist with some tips on making 2013 the year you get into shape.

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More information from University of Missouri Extension:

Walk Yourself to Good Health

Five More Reasons to Exercise

Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire

 

Bringing Home the Turkey

“Coexistence: what the farmer does with the turkey – until Thanksgiving” ` Mike Connolly (Photo by Rachel Spauldling)

According to the National Turkey Federation, 95 percent of Americans eat turkey at their Thanksgiving meal. Since it’s likely that a turkey will be the centerpiece of your holiday meal, do you know how big a bird to buy? If the turkey is frozen, do you know how to thaw it safely? University of Missouri Extension is here to help you with these questions. Listen to the podcast or download it and listen to it later. But, don’t wait too long, turkey day is almost here.

 

Today’s guest is Tammy Roberts, nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

Check out Turkey Tips from the Missouri Families website.

Help Children Enjoy Halloween without Candy Overload

There is a child in every one of us who is still a Trick-or-Treater looking for a brightly lit front porch. ~ Robert Brault (Illustration by Rainer Topf)

Halloween is a popular holiday because kids get to bring home lots of treats, mostly candy. Too much of anything always has consequences. This creates a tough balancing act for parents who want their children to enjoy the holiday, but would rather avoid tummy aches, tooth decay and too many calories.

Today’s guest is Tammy Roberts, nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She has some tips for helping children make good choices while still enjoying the fun and excitement of Trick-or-Treat.

 

 

 

Pumpkin Pie or Jack-O-Lantern – Why Not Both?

The littlest pumpkins have the biggest grins. (Photo by Katrina DeLourve)

Today we pay homage to the versatile pumpkin. It’s a mainstay for Halloween decorations, but shouldn’t be overlooked as a nutritious fruit that’s low in fat and calories.

Our guest today is Tammy Roberts, nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She has tips for recycling your Jack-O-Lanterns into yummy pies, breads, soups and stews.

 

 

Find more information and some delicious recipes at Pumpkins – From Harvest to Health

Salt – More Than Just a Pinch

“Give neither counsel nor salt till you are asked for it” ~ Italian Proverb (Photo by Bruno Sersocima)

Whether it’s added to morning eggs, or part of the crunchy taste of potato chips, we love salt.  It’s actually the ultimate spice because our taste buds respond to salt and open up making everything taste better. The problem is we’ve moved salt from a flavor enhancer to a habit with medical consequences.

The good news there are ways to kick a salt obsession. Just a little behavior modification can train taste buds to savour other flavors.

 

 

Today’s guests are nutrition specialist Tammy Roberts, human environmental sciences specialist Ellen Schuster and nutrition specialist Susan Mills-Gray. All three are with University of Missouri Extension

More tips and information:

Decreasing Salt Can Decrease Blood Pressure

Is Sea Salt Healthier Than Table Salt?

Is There a Salt That’s Healthy?

Don’t Let Uninvited Guests Tarnish Outdoor Cookouts

"The only time to eat diet food is while you're waiting for the steak to cook." ~ Julia Child (Photo by Lukas Patkan)

The transition between spring and summer is full of beautiful, blue-sky days. It’s the perfect time for picnics, camping and barbecues. But, there’s one problem with outdoor cooking. If you don’t use care with perishable foods, you, your family and friends could be battling food borne illness rather than having lots of fun.

 

 

Today’s guest is Tammy Roberts, nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

More food safety tips can be found on the Missouri Families webpage.