Home and Garden

Flowering Annuals: Year of the Begonia
"Flowers are the music of the ground From earth's lips spoken without sound." ~ Edwin Curran, Poet (Photo from the National Garden Bureau)

“Flowers are the music of the ground
From earth’s lips spoken without sound.” ~ Edwin Curran, Poet (Photo from the National Garden Bureau)

Some begonias are grown for their uniquely shape leaves; others for flowers. Many work well as container plants and if you’re looking for pretty border plants, for a formal flowerbed, begonia is a great choice. So, with all this versatility it’s easy to understand why the National Garden Bureau named the Begonia the Flowering Annual for 2016.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

 

 

Flowering Annuals: Characteristics and Culture

The Year of the Carrot
If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. ~ Cicero (Photo courtesy of the National Garden Bureau)

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. ~
Cicero (Photo courtesy of the National Garden Bureau)

The modern day carrot has been bred to be sweet, crunchy and aromatic. This popular root vegetable is a member of the parsley family and so is related to dill,  cilantro,  cumin and even poisonous hemlock.

Carrots are easy to grow and can give the home gardener a lot of nutrition in a small space. They’re rich in beta carotene, an important antioxidant and vitamin-A from a carrot is off the charts. But that’s not all, you’ll get vitamins C and K, potassium,  fiber, and much, much more.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has tips for adding the nutritional powerhouse to your garden.

Want daffodil, tulips and hyacinths in the spring? Plant them now
Earth laughs in flowers. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson (Photo by Martin Hirtreiter)

Earth laughs in flowers. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson (Photo by Martin Hirtreiter)

If you want your spring garden to burst with color, you need to plan ahead. Spring bulbs like narcissus, tulips and hyacinths must be planted in fall in order to flower in the spring.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has advice on choosing healthy bulbs and how to plant them. He also talks about the best spring flowering bulb for Missouri.

 

 

Spring Flowering Bulbs: Daffodils

 

 

 

White and Purple Hyacinths (Photo by Elena Schifirnet)

White and Purple Hyacinths (Photo by Elena Schifirnet)

 

 

 

Tulips (Photo by John O'Neill)

Tulips (Photo by John O’Neill)

Narcissus Jonquilla (Photo by A. Barra)

Narcissus Jonquilla (Photo by A. Barra)

Helping Picky Eaters ‘Grow’ into Healthy Eaters
Garden 'n Grow Kids in Kirksville, MO (Left to righ: Emmit Cody, Elizabeth Cody, Morgan Mullock, Bailey Malen, and in the back: Melanie Cody and Joseph Berg) Photo by Debbie Johnson

Garden ‘n Grow Kids in Kirksville, MO (Left to right: Emmit Cody, Elizabeth Cody, Morgan Mullock, Bailey Malen, and in the back: Melanie Cody and Joseph Berg) Photo by Debbie Johnson

A parent stares across the table at their child’s untouched dinner plate. The body language says, in no uncertain terms, will the food in in front of them end up in their mouth. They fidget and push the food around the plate, as they whine the all-too-familiar battle cry, “But I don’t like it.”

This battle of wills is a constant for families with a picky eater. It turns out that helping young children understand how to grow food will completely change the way they look at the food they eat.

Today’s guests are Jennifer Schutter, horticulture specialist and Margo Myers, nutrition specialist. Both are with the University of Missouri Extension office in Kirksville. You’ll also hear from 11-year-old Joseph Berg and 10-year-old Morgan Mullock. Both attended this year’s Garden ‘n Grow program in Kirksville.

 

 

University of Missouri Extension Garden ‘n Grow program

MU Extension Garden ‘n Grow program in Adair County

Dying of Thirst – Very Wet Spring Makes Plants, Trees and Shrubs Vulnerable
"Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit - He who has a garden and a library wants for nothing." ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero

“He who has a garden and a library wants for nothing.” ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero

July heat has arrived in Missouri, and it’s putting garden and landscape plants at risk. Because we had such a wet spring, plants, trees and shrubs don’t have the deep roots necessary to ride out the summer heat and less rain.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has tips for watering your plants so they can recover from our super-soggy spring.

 

 

Wet Weather Woes

Keeping Brown Patch at Bay
Brown patch spreading on a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Brown patch spreading on a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Conditions are perfect for brown patch to ravage your lawn. Control isn’t easy and it may be better to give up and wait for the fall to reseed areas where the fungus damaged your grass.

Today’s guest is Lee Miller, a plant pathologist for University of Missouri Extension. He has tips for controlling brown patch and lawn maintenance practices that can curb the spread of the disease.

 

 

Identification and Management of Turfgrass Diseases

Brown Patch Lawn Disease Could Erupt in Home Landscapes This Summer
Brown spot in a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Brown spot in a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Nitrogen fertilizer, heat and water is like ringing the dinner bell for fungi hoping to snack on your nice green lawn. If you have tall fescue, the culprit is Rhizoctonia solani, which causes brown patch. As the name implies, brown patches show up in your lawn. Many homeowners, when they see their grass turn brown, add fertilizer and water to help it green up. Big mistake, your giving the fungus exactly what it needs.

Today’s guest is Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has information about dealing with brown patch, how to recognize it and how to treat it.

 

 

Identification and Management of Turfgrass Diseases

 

You can brown patch  tan lesions on the blade of tall fescue (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

You can see brown patch tan lesions on the blade of tall fescue (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

 

Got Calcium? Your Tomatoes Need It
Blossom-end rot is first seen when tomatoes are one-third to one-half full size. (Photo by Patrick Byers, University of Missouri Extension)

Blossom-end rot is first seen when tomatoes are one-third to one-half full size. (Photo by Patrick Byers, University of Missouri Extension)

When tomatoes, peppers, melons, and eggplant develop a sunken, rotten spot on the end of the fruit it’s not caused by a disease or insect pest. It happens when the plant doesn’t get enough calcium. It’s a fairly common garden problem. Turns out there are lots of things that can happen that can deny calcium to your plants.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He discuss the causes and how to prevent it.

 

 

Growing Home Garden Tomatoes

The Noise, Noise, Noise, Noise – Periodical Cicadas Arriving in Missouri
“Do you know the legend about cicadas? They say they are the souls of poets who cannot keep quiet because, when they were alive, they never wrote the poems they wanted to.” ~ John Berger, author (Photo by Roger Meissen)

“Do you know the legend about cicadas? They say they are the souls of poets who cannot keep quiet because, when they were alive, they never wrote the poems they wanted to.” ~ John Berger, author (Photo by Roger Meissen)

It’s an amazing event that only occurs in North America. Periodical cicadas live underground for 13 and 17 years, and then in one mass reproduction cession the crawl out of the ground and take to the trees. They will come out in the thousands, and it can be very overwhelming because these insects will make a lot of noise for several weeks. This year the periodical cicadas will emerge in Kansas City and Cape Girardeau.

Today’s guest is Bruce Barrett, entomologist for University of Missouri Extension. He has lots of information about these fascinating insects and this amazing event.

 

 

Periodical Cicadas in Missouri

Cool, Wet Weather Makes Fungus Flourish
"Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago" ~ Warren Buffett, American Businessman (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

“Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago” ~ Warren Buffett, American Businessman (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

An annual curse when cool, wet springs trigger anthracnose to flourish. It’s caused by a group of fungi that can attack trees, shrubs, flowers and just about anything green.

Today’s guests are Hank Stelzer, forestry specialist for University of Missouri Extension and Patricia Hosack, director of the MU Plant diagnostic clinic. Both discuss this disease and why it’s important to keep trees healthy so they can survive the attack of anthracnose.

 

 

Anthracnose on Shade Trees