Home and Garden

Sweet Pepper – Garden Color and Spice
"The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies" ~ Gertrude Jekyll, influential British horticulturist (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

“The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies” ~ Gertrude Jekyll, influential British horticulturist (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Many different types of peppers can be grown in Missouri vegetable gardens. Among the most popular are the sweet bell and banana types. This warm season vegetable should not be planted in the garden until there’s no danger of frost. Peppers are normally harvested in the immature green stage for use in relishes, salads, for stuffing, and for flavor in many cooked dishes.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

 

 

Growing Sweet Peppers in Missouri

Gaillardia – Drought-Tolerant Color in the Garden
Gaillardia - Mesa Bright Bicolor (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Gaillardia – Mesa Bright Bicolor (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Gaillardia is a perfect addition to a Missouri garden. They bloom heavily from summer through fall, don’t mind the heat, and get by with much less water.

Give gaillardia full sun, good air circulation and well-drained soil and it will thrive. If you have clay soil, you will need to amend it. Wet feet will make it impossible for gaillardia to survive the winter.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

Gaillardia - Mesa Yellow (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Gaillardia – Mesa Yellow (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Coleus – Garden Color Without Flowers
Coleus - Electric Lime

Coleus – Electric Lime (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Plant breeders have made sun-tolerant improvements to coleus and the popularity of this long-time favorite is growing. No longer is coleus relegated to the shady parts of your yard. With proper watering the new sun-fast coleus can thrive in blistering sun.

 

2015: Year of the Coleus

Coleus - Color Blaze Series - Dipt in Wine (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Coleus – Color Blaze Series – Dipt in Wine (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Coleus -   Redhead (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Coleus – Redhead (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

 

Poison Proof Your Home
What dangers are hidden under your kitchen sink? (Photo by Jon Lamb)

What dangers are hidden under your kitchen sink? (Photo by Jon Lamb)

If you do a quick inventory of the chemicals in your home, I bet the list is long. Toilet bowl cleaners, medicine, cosmetics, tile cleaners, bathroom deodorizers, mouthwash, mothballs, nail polish remover, bleach and ammonia are found in the kitchen and bathroom of most homes. More than 90 percent of poisonings occur in the home and most are preventable if you can keep poison away from tiny fingers.

 

 

Today’s guest is Kandace Fisher-McLean, housing and environmental design specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

 

Poison Safety

Hazardous Look-A-Likes in a Child’s World

Poison Control Hotline: 1-800-222-1222

Master Gardener Online Training from University of Missouri Extension
"Gardening is cheaper than therapy and you get tomatoes." ~ Author Unknown (Photo courtesy of the National Garden Bureau)

“Gardening is cheaper than therapy and you get tomatoes.” ~ Author Unknown (Photo courtesy of the National Garden Bureau)

You no longer need to travel great distances to get training for Master Gardener certification. Now the training is offered online. Check out: Missouri Master Gardener Online Training.

From Seed to Harvest and Beyond: Garden Journal and Calendar

University of Missouri Extension offers a useful tool to help both new and experience gardeners create and maintain beautiful and productive gardens. The Garden Journal will help you keep track of everything in your garden. It explains hardiness zones, soil tests, monthly garden tips and tips for controlling pests and diseases.     Order: From…

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Diagnosing poor plant health
Many things can attack a plant causing it to decline (Photo by Jon Lamb - University of Missouri Extension Communications)

Many things can attack a plant causing it to decline (Photo by Jon Lamb – University of Missouri Extension Communications)

Indiscriminately spreading chemicals for ailing plants is a bad idea. Many things can cause problems for plants: insects, viruses, bacteria, fungi and even poor nutrition. You need to know what’s wrong before you can choose the correct treatment. For people in the Midwest, the University of Missouri’s Plant Diagnostic Clinic is a good place to get your plant problems diagnosed.

 

 

 

 

MU Plant Diagnostic Clinic

Patti Wallace, director of the MU Plant Diagnostic Clinic, examines an ailing tomato plant (Photo by Jon Lamb, University of Missouri Extension Communications

Patti Wallace, director of the MU Plant Diagnostic Clinic, examines an ailing tomato plant (Photo by Jon Lamb, University of Missouri Extension Communications

 

Beautiful bulbs – Heralds of spring need care and feeding
“She turned to the sunlight  And shook her yellow head,  And whispered to her neighbour:  "Winter is dead."  ~ A.A. Milne from When We Were Very Young

“She turned to the sunlight
And shook her yellow head,
And whispered to her neighbour:
“Winter is dead.”
~ A.A. Milne from “When We Were Very Young”

Nothing signals the end of winter like bright daffodils and colorful tulips. Spring flowering bulbs are easy to grow and always rewarding. To enjoy their early spring show you must plant these bulbs in the fall and care for them after they bloom.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has some dos and don’ts for keeping daffodils, tulips and hyacinths happy and putting on a glorious spring show year-after-year.

 

 

Post-Flowering Care of Spring Bulbs

Spring Flowering Bulbs

"The tulips make we want to paint, Something about the way they drop Their petals on the tabletop And do not wilt so much as faint" ~ A. E. Stallings from him poem "Tulips" (Photo by John O'Neill)

“The tulips make we want to paint,
Something about the way they drop
Their petals on the tabletop
And do not wilt so much as faint”
~ A. E. Stallings from him poem “Tulips” (Photo by John O’Neill)

"Here hyacinths of heavenly blue Shook their rich tresses to the morn" ~ James Montgomery, British editor and poet from his poem "The Adventure of a Star." (Photo by John O'Neill

“Here hyacinths of heavenly blue
Shook their rich tresses to the morn”
~ James Montgomery, British editor and poet from his poem “The Adventure of a Star.” (Photo by John O’Neill)

One wascally wabbit knew best
"Carrots are divine, you get a dozen for a dime, it's maaaaaaagic!" ~ Bugs Bunny (Photo from the National Garden Bureau)

“Carrots are divine, you get a dozen for a dime, it’s maaaaaaagic!” ~ Bugs Bunny (Photo from the National Garden Bureau)

Bugs Bunny was never seen without a carrot at hand. Could it be the nutritional boost he got from his favorite food that kept him one step ahead of Elmer Fudd?

You should consider growing carrots in your garden. Fresh-from-the-garden carrots are often the sweetest and tastiest.

Home grown carrots also offer a great teaching moment for children. Watch the look of awe and surprise from a young child when you pop a carrot out of the ground, rinse it off and hand it to them to eat. They’ll think you’ve discovered buried treasure, which of course you have.

It’s time to plant peas
"In my garden, care stops at the gate and gazes at me wistfully through the bars." ~ Alexander Smith, Scottish poet (Photo from the National Garden Bureau)

“In my garden, care stops at the gate and gazes at me wistfully through the bars.” ~ Alexander Smith, Scottish poet (Photo from the National Garden Bureau)

Peas are one of first vegetables that you’ll plant and harvest. The crisp texture and sweet taste of fresh peas truly embodies spring.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He says if you live in Missouri you need to get peas in the ground as soon as you can work the soil because when the heat of summer arrives your garden peas will be gone.