Home and Garden

Dying of Thirst – Very Wet Spring Makes Plants, Trees and Shrubs Vulnerable
"Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit - He who has a garden and a library wants for nothing." ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero

“He who has a garden and a library wants for nothing.” ~ Marcus Tullius Cicero

July heat has arrived in Missouri, and it’s putting garden and landscape plants at risk. Because we had such a wet spring, plants, trees and shrubs don’t have the deep roots necessary to ride out the summer heat and less rain.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has tips for watering your plants so they can recover from our super-soggy spring.

 

 

Wet Weather Woes

Keeping Brown Patch at Bay
Brown patch spreading on a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Brown patch spreading on a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Conditions are perfect for brown patch to ravage your lawn. Control isn’t easy and it may be better to give up and wait for the fall to reseed areas where the fungus damaged your grass.

Today’s guest is Lee Miller, a plant pathologist for University of Missouri Extension. He has tips for controlling brown patch and lawn maintenance practices that can curb the spread of the disease.

 

 

Identification and Management of Turfgrass Diseases

Brown Patch Lawn Disease Could Erupt in Home Landscapes This Summer
Brown spot in a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Brown spot in a tall fescue lawn (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

Nitrogen fertilizer, heat and water is like ringing the dinner bell for fungi hoping to snack on your nice green lawn. If you have tall fescue, the culprit is Rhizoctonia solani, which causes brown patch. As the name implies, brown patches show up in your lawn. Many homeowners, when they see their grass turn brown, add fertilizer and water to help it green up. Big mistake, your giving the fungus exactly what it needs.

Today’s guest is Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He has information about dealing with brown patch, how to recognize it and how to treat it.

 

 

Identification and Management of Turfgrass Diseases

 

You can brown patch  tan lesions on the blade of tall fescue (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

You can see brown patch tan lesions on the blade of tall fescue (Photo by Brad Fresenburg, turf specialist for University of Missouri Extension)

 

Got Calcium? Your Tomatoes Need It
Blossom-end rot is first seen when tomatoes are one-third to one-half full size. (Photo by Patrick Byers, University of Missouri Extension)

Blossom-end rot is first seen when tomatoes are one-third to one-half full size. (Photo by Patrick Byers, University of Missouri Extension)

When tomatoes, peppers, melons, and eggplant develop a sunken, rotten spot on the end of the fruit it’s not caused by a disease or insect pest. It happens when the plant doesn’t get enough calcium. It’s a fairly common garden problem. Turns out there are lots of things that can happen that can deny calcium to your plants.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. He discuss the causes and how to prevent it.

 

 

Growing Home Garden Tomatoes

The Noise, Noise, Noise, Noise – Periodical Cicadas Arriving in Missouri
“Do you know the legend about cicadas? They say they are the souls of poets who cannot keep quiet because, when they were alive, they never wrote the poems they wanted to.” ~ John Berger, author (Photo by Roger Meissen)

“Do you know the legend about cicadas? They say they are the souls of poets who cannot keep quiet because, when they were alive, they never wrote the poems they wanted to.” ~ John Berger, author (Photo by Roger Meissen)

It’s an amazing event that only occurs in North America. Periodical cicadas live underground for 13 and 17 years, and then in one mass reproduction cession the crawl out of the ground and take to the trees. They will come out in the thousands, and it can be very overwhelming because these insects will make a lot of noise for several weeks. This year the periodical cicadas will emerge in Kansas City and Cape Girardeau.

Today’s guest is Bruce Barrett, entomologist for University of Missouri Extension. He has lots of information about these fascinating insects and this amazing event.

 

 

Periodical Cicadas in Missouri

Cool, Wet Weather Makes Fungus Flourish
"Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago" ~ Warren Buffett, American Businessman (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

“Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago” ~ Warren Buffett, American Businessman (Photo by Debbie Johnson)

An annual curse when cool, wet springs trigger anthracnose to flourish. It’s caused by a group of fungi that can attack trees, shrubs, flowers and just about anything green.

Today’s guests are Hank Stelzer, forestry specialist for University of Missouri Extension and Patricia Hosack, director of the MU Plant diagnostic clinic. Both discuss this disease and why it’s important to keep trees healthy so they can survive the attack of anthracnose.

 

 

Anthracnose on Shade Trees

Rose Rosette – A Deadly Virus in Roses
The witch's broom stem and leaves on a rose infected with rose rosette (Photo by Chris Starbuck)

The witch’s broom stems and leaves on a rose infected with rose rosette (Photo by Chris Starbuck)

Commonly found on wild roses (Rosa Multiflora) in Midwestern, Southern and Eastern U.S., rose rosette is a virus that is 100% fatal in all roses. This is a heartbreaker for the rose loving gardener because there is no cure.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension.  He has more information on rose rosette including symptoms and best method for removing infected plants.

 

 

Rose Rosette Disease

Sweet Pepper – Garden Color and Spice
"The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies" ~ Gertrude Jekyll, influential British horticulturist (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

“The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies” ~ Gertrude Jekyll, influential British horticulturist (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Many different types of peppers can be grown in Missouri vegetable gardens. Among the most popular are the sweet bell and banana types. This warm season vegetable should not be planted in the garden until there’s no danger of frost. Peppers are normally harvested in the immature green stage for use in relishes, salads, for stuffing, and for flavor in many cooked dishes.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

 

 

Growing Sweet Peppers in Missouri

Gaillardia – Drought-Tolerant Color in the Garden
Gaillardia - Mesa Bright Bicolor (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Gaillardia – Mesa Bright Bicolor (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Gaillardia is a perfect addition to a Missouri garden. They bloom heavily from summer through fall, don’t mind the heat, and get by with much less water.

Give gaillardia full sun, good air circulation and well-drained soil and it will thrive. If you have clay soil, you will need to amend it. Wet feet will make it impossible for gaillardia to survive the winter.

Today’s guest is David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension.

Gaillardia - Mesa Yellow (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Gaillardia – Mesa Yellow (Photo by the National Garden Bureau)

Coleus – Garden Color Without Flowers
Coleus - Electric Lime

Coleus – Electric Lime (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Plant breeders have made sun-tolerant improvements to coleus and the popularity of this long-time favorite is growing. No longer is coleus relegated to the shady parts of your yard. With proper watering the new sun-fast coleus can thrive in blistering sun.

 

2015: Year of the Coleus

Coleus - Color Blaze Series - Dipt in Wine (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Coleus – Color Blaze Series – Dipt in Wine (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Coleus -   Redhead (Photo by National Garden Bureau)

Coleus – Redhead (Photo by National Garden Bureau)