Mind and Body

The Ugly Gs – Guilt and Grudge

"I've had a few arguments with people, but I never carry a grudge. You know why? While you're carrying a grudge, they're out dancing. " ~ Buddy Hackett (Photo by Peter Suneson)

Of all the multitude of human emotions, guilt and resentment can break your spirit and crush the enjoyment out of life.  You can carry both for a lifetime, and never recognize the weight that you’re dragging with you.

Guilt is a sense of inadequacy and self-reproach for feeling you have failed the “should’s,” “could’s” and “would’s”…”I should have done…”, “I could have done…” and “I would have done…”  Carrying guilt is not only physically and mentally harmful, it’s unfair.   No amount of guilt can undo a deed, or correct an error, so learning to forgive yourself is one of the healthiest ways to move on with your life.

Grudges, too, are ugly and self-defeating. While it’s human nature to want to strike back at someone who harms you, grudges zap your energy and cause little or no harm to the person who hurt you.  For both guilt and grudges, learning to forgive can set you free.

 

 

Today’s guest is Vera Massey, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She is also co-creator of the MU Extension Taking Care of You Program.

To find a local “Taking Care of You” program, go to the MU Extension website and search for “Taking Care of You.”

The Iceberg Model of Health

The Iceberg Model, developed by John Travis, M.D. and Regina Ryan, teaches that our physical health is only the tip of the iceberg. Hidden below the surface are all the dimensions that determine and support our current state of health. You can’t make changes on the surface until you address the issues below the surface.…

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Finding Joy

"The foolish man seeks happiness in the distance; the wise grows it under his feet." ~ James Openheim

Children are masters of finding joy.  They can be in tears over a broken toy one minute and next laughing and giggling while enjoying a high-flying swing.

Adults are different. Instead of finding joy within, we are constantly searching for something or someone who can make us happy.  No one or nothing can make you happy.  You have to nurture it from within, and then share it with others.

 

Today’s guest is Vera Massey, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist for University of Missouri Extension. She is also co-creator of the MU Extension Taking Care of You Program.

 

To find a local “Taking Care of You” program, go to the MU Extension website and search for “Taking Care of You.”

 

Living in the Moment

"You can clutch the past so tightly to your chest that it leaves your arms too full to embrace the present." ~ Jan Glidewell

We can spend so much time worrying about the past or the future that every one of our “nows” disappear.

No amount of worry will ever change the past. What’s done is done. Life is a journey and each moment is an opportunity to live and learn.

The same applies for the future. You don’t have any idea what tomorrow may bring. It could be bad news, or joy and happiness; most likely a combination of all those things.

Living in the moment is recognizing that every single moment of now is a priceless gift.

Today’s guest is Molly Vetters-Smith, assistant professor for Extension education and state health specialist. She is also co-creator of the “Taking Care of You” program.

To find a local “Taking Care of You” program, go to the MU Extension website and search for “Taking Care of You.”

The Whole You

“Be you. Find you. Be happy with that.”

Taking Care of You: Body – Mind – Spirit incorporates research-based concepts and strategies from the field of positive psychology. The idea of “The Whole You” encompasses the idea that there are multiple aspects to each of us: physical, mental, intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual.  Our health and well being improves when we consider all these dimensions.

The Taking Care of You program is offered by University of Missouri Extension.  This is an 8-session, community-based group that meets one-hour each week. The program is designed for adults of any age and involves discussions, exercises and mini-lectures.

 

 

Today’s guest was Vera Massey, Nutrition and Health Education Specialist for University of Missouri Extension, and co-creator of the “Taking Care of You” program.

To find a local “Taking Care of You” program, go to the MU Extension website and search for “Taking Care of You.”