Nov 272013
 

"To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone." ~ Reba McEntire (Photo by Calle Eklund)

“To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone.” ~ Reba McEntire (Photo by Calle Eklund)

How about some turkey trivia? Americans consume over 675 million pounds of turkey on Thanksgiving Day. Sleepy after your big Thanksgiving meal? Turkey contains an amino acid called “Tryptophan”. Tryptophan sets off a chemical chain reaction that calms you down and makes you sleepy. The wishbone is a tradition of Thanksgiving. Allow the wishbone to dry. Then, two people grasp each end of the wishbone. After making a silent wish, they pull it away. Whoever gets the joint portion, gets their wish.

Today’s guest is Jeff Firman. He’s an animal scientist and poultry expert for University of Missouri’s College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. Raising turkeys is a challenge because while breeding them for plump, tasty meat, their brains were short-changed.

 Posted by on November 27, 2013 at 8:13 pm
Nov 202013
 

Photo by Kent Faddis

Photo by Kent Faddis

While you’re traveling from store to store buying holiday gifts, criminals are watching and waiting for the opportunity to snatch your money and newly bought presents. Be aware of your surroundings and make  yourself less of a target. This will go a long way toward keeping you from being a victim. Today, we have tips from John Worden, director of the University of Missouri Extension’s Law Enforcement Training Institute.

 Posted by on November 20, 2013 at 4:55 pm
Nov 122013
 

October Temperatures. Graphic from Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program

October Temperatures. Graphic from Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program

October weather was an unusual weather month. It started out mild but the weather shifted and record low temperatures visited the Show-Me State. Rainfall averages were around normal, however, some dry spots in the state received much-needed rain. Today’s guest in Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension’s Commercial Agriculture Program. He has an overview of October weather in Missouri and has predictions for November weather.

 

 

Missouri Climate Center

 Posted by on November 12, 2013 at 9:26 pm
Nov 012013
 

"Handwashing is one of the most important means of preventing the spread of infection" according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  (Photo by Dani Toth)

“Hand washing is one of the most important means of preventing the spread of infection” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (Photo by Dani Toth)

You touch a doorknob then touch your nose. A few days later you have chills, a bad cough and sneezing. Frequent hand washing can help you stop infecting yourself with your hands.

This is most important for children. By teaching them to do a good job of washing their hands you can help them avoid colds and flu.

 

 

Hand washing poster

 Posted by on November 1, 2013 at 7:53 pm
Oct 172013
 

Chart from Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension Commercial Agriculture program

Chart from Pat Guinan, climatologist for University of Missouri Extension Commercial Agriculture program

The beginning of autumn in Missouri showed little indication that cool, crisp, fall weather was about to arrive. That warm trend continued into early October. In contrast, most of this year’s summer was cooler than normal. For the Show-Me State, real summer heat didn’t arrive until August and September.

 

 

Missouri Climate Center

 Posted by on October 17, 2013 at 9:10 pm
Oct 152013
 

Marcy Weber, left,  bought a home, has a full-time job and is alcohol and drug free after participating in the Cass County Drug Court program that uses a community demonstration garden coordinated by the University of Missouri Extension. Master Gardener Darra Simpson is one of the volunteers who has helped participants learn teamwork and responsibility through the ‘magic of gardening.’ Photo by Linda Geist

Marcy Weber, left, bought a home, has a full-time job and is alcohol and drug free after participating in the Cass County Drug Court program that uses a community demonstration garden coordinated by the University of Missouri Extension. Master Gardener Darra Simpson is one of the volunteers who has helped participants learn teamwork and responsibility through the ‘magic of gardening.’ Photo by Linda Geist

There are so many difficulties to overcome when trying to escape drug abuse. You tend to keep company with other users, making it difficult to escape the vicious circle of substance abuse. Drugs become so all-consuming that you stop caring for yourself.

One community in Missouri is trying to give people who are lost in drugs a way back. Cass County Missouri’s Drug Court and University of Missouri Extension teamed up to teach gardening and along the way they teach confidence, independence and a way home.

 

 

News audio available at MU Extension Radio News Service

 

 Posted by on October 15, 2013 at 6:07 pm
Oct 032013
 

Mel George (right) tells Sally Foster (left) that she has severe breast cancer as part of the interactive theater, done by the MU Breast Cancer Project. (Photo by Emily Kaiser)

Mel George (right) tells Sally Foster (left) that she has severe breast cancer as part of the interactive theater, done by the MU Breast Cancer Project. (Photo by Emily Kaiser)

Whether you’re giving or getting bad news, knowing how to communicate is vital. This is most important when a doctor must tell a woman that she has breast cancer. The shocked patient must ask questions about what’s ahead. The doctor has to provide important information while still addressing the patient’s fears and confusion. There is no more important communication, but learning how to have this kind of dialogue isn’t easy. That’s where the University of Missouri’s Breast Cancer Dialogues, an interactive theater program, steps up.

This collaboration between University of Missouri Extension’s Community Arts Program, MU’s Family and Community Medicine department and MU’s Theater department gives both health providers and patients the opportunity to discuss what works, what doesn’t work and how to improve this very important communication.

 

 

Breast Cancer Dialogues

 

 Posted by on October 3, 2013 at 5:13 pm
Sep 272013
 

"The way you think, the way you behave, the way you eat can influence your life by 30 to 50 years" ~ Deepak Chopra (Photo in the Public Domain from the National Institutes of Health)

“The way you think, the way you behave, the way you eat can influence your life by 30 to 50 years” ~ Deepak Chopra (Photo in the Public Domain from the National Institutes of Health)

Just like bathing and teeth brushing, healthy eating habits are the foundation for a healthy life. When toddlers and preschoolers are served nourishing, wholesome foods, they are more likely to eat these foods as they get older. That’s the goal of the Missouri Eat Smart Child Care initiative. This partnership between University of Missouri Extension and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services provides early childhood educators with the tools and information they need to introduce healthy habits to young children.

Today’s guests are Robin Gammon, University of Missouri Extension’s registered dietitian, Susan Mills-Gray…nutrition specialist for University of Missouri Extension and Shelley Gifford… director of the Little Einstein’s Learning Center in Blue Springs, Missouri.

 

Missouri Eat Smart Child Care Initiative

 Posted by on September 27, 2013 at 4:46 pm
Sep 162013
 

Hyphae of Rhizoctonia solani with right-angled branching pattern. J. Thompson photo.

Hyphae of Rhizoctonia solani with right-angled branching pattern. J. Thompson photo.

Your once beautiful lawn is suddenly sprinkled with unsightly patches of brown grass. Does it need water? Does it need fertilizer? In many cases it needs neither. You could be looking at a fungal disease: large patch in zoysiagrass or brown patch on tall fescue.

Today’s guest is Lee Miller, associate professor of plant sciences for University of Missouri Extension. He talks about the latest research for controlling large patch and brown patch. He also has tips to help homeowners keep their lawn healthy so it doesn’t fall victim to these diseases.

 

 

Identification and Management of Turfgrass Diseases – Brown Patch

identification and Management of Turfgrass Diseases – Large Patch

 Posted by on September 16, 2013 at 4:30 pm
Sep 112013
 

Scammers and con artists will always try to separate you from you money. They use all types of tricks and trades to rip you off. Now, the Affordable Care Act is a new tool in their arsenal. Today’s Guest is Brenda Procter, associate professor of consumer and family economics for University of Missouri Extension. She talks about things you can do to protect yourself and your money.

 Posted by on September 11, 2013 at 9:40 pm